Tags:

Featured Video

We have important news to share with teachers, parents, and readers of all ages!  Please visit our new blog.                                       

August 10, 2016

BLOG_Summer_H

Every month, TAB editor Kristin will be sharing her thoughts on five titles from our… Read More

June 1, 2016

BLOG_2_911_V3
The National Day of Service and Remembrance

Following the attacks of September 11, 2001, there was a welcome flood of community service and volunteerism across the United States. While mourning the tragedy, people everywhere volunteered and served their fellow citizens in their own communities. The National Day of Service and Remembrance is intended to keep this compassionate spirit alive, while honoring the victims and survivors of that day. Rather than allowing the day to become one of hate and spite, it has become a day of commemoration and kindness.

For adults, the events of 9/11 can still feel very recent. Thirteen years ago, many of us were worried about friends and loved ones, our communities, and our country. It can be a difficult day as we are faced with memories that loom large and we’re reminded over and over about the unforgettable events of that day.

For the children in our lives, whether students or our own kids, this event has moved past being a contemporary event into American history. It can be difficult to talk about the events of that day, but we hope the books and resources below will help open lines of communication for you and answer some of the questions that may arise.

May you find a quiet moment today to reflect on the events of 9/11 in a manner that comforts you and take some time to share kindness in your own community.

You can find resources to help kids understand the events of 9/11 at scholastic.com.

Tags: ,

Share

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

September 11, 2014