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August 10, 2016

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Every month, TAB editor Kristin will be sharing her thoughts on five titles from our… Read More

June 1, 2016

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Reading Club Confidential: Darcy Evans

 

Earlier this month, we shared an Editor’s Picks list for picture-book fans from Darcy Evans. We loved hearing about her favorite books and thought it would be fun to learn a little more about her. We hope you enjoy this sneak peek behind the scenes with this member of our editorial staff!

 

Book Box Daily: What do you do at Scholastic?

Darcy Evans: I work on the Firefly and SeeSaw reading clubs.

BBD: How long have you worked here?

DE: Four months.

BBD: How did you end up working for Scholastic Reading Club?

DE: While I was getting my graduate degree in children’s literature, I worked part-time as an editor at Riffle Books, curating their children’s list. David Allender (the man in charge over here) saw what I was doing and sent me a tweet. Yes, he got in touch with me over Twitter, as crazy as that sounds. At first I thought he just wanted to talk about doing some sort of Scholastic promotion, but after a couple of e-mails and phone calls, he asked me to come in for a job interview. The whole thing was rather kismet since I was already moving to New York and wanted to work in children’s publishing. It has really been a dream come true!

BBD: What’s your favorite part of your job?

DE: Oh, that’s hard. Probably getting to read so many wonderful picture books. I really must have the best job in the world because I get to spend my days reading and rereading great stories and looking at stunning illustrations. It’s such a magical time for picture books right now. Printing technology has advanced to the point where we can print four or five colors with full bleeds pretty easily, which gives artists so much more room to create without worrying about prohibitive reproduction costs. Authors and illustrators have really embraced this and are publishing such imaginative books!

BBD: What’s the most memorable book you’ve read while working here?

DE: I can only pick one?! I have to say, I’m a little obsessed right now with Have You Seen My Dragon? by Steve Light. It is hard to find a good counting book that does more than just count things, but this one really takes you on a journey. I’m also a really huge fan of This Book Just Ate My Dog! by Richard Byrne. I love books that play with the idea of a book as an art object instead of just art on the page, and this book does it masterfully. The gutter, or the crease between the two folding pages of the book, is an active character, which is just brilliant. Sorry, I couldn’t just pick one.

BBD: How many books do you think you’ve read while working at Scholastic?

DE: Oh, maybe 100, more? The advantage of predominately working with picture books is that they’re a pretty quick read. Even if I only read one or two a day, that’s a lot of books.

BBD: What were your favorite books as a child?

DE: Even as a child I was a big picture book fan. I really loved Allen Say’s Tree of Cranes and this little-known Nancy Willard book called The High Rise Glorious Skittle Skat Roarious Sky Pie Angel Food Cake and anything by Jon Scieszka, though Math Curse is probably my favorite.

BBD: Is there a book that changed your life?

DE: Strangely, it was Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card. I was probably 10 or 11 when I read it for the first time. I was not a reader as a child. I was the kid who would much rather be outside climbing trees than stuck inside with a book. Ender’s Game is the first book I remember really loving. After that I read like a madwoman.

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February 25, 2015